Tag Archives: Disney

The Pirates! Band of Misfits (2012)

From the people who made Wallace & Gromit and Chicken RunThe Pirates! Band of Misfits is one of the five animated films nominated for Best Animated Feature at this year’s Academy Awards.

This film tells the story of Pirate Captain (Hugh Grant), the leader of a group of the strangest “pirates” you’ll ever see. He yearns to be named “Pirate of the Year” in the annual awards ceremony, but he just doesn’t quite measure up to the other booty-gathering pirates he competes against. Setting sail with his crew and his trusted bird Polly, Pirate Captain attempts to plunder ships for gold with no luck, succeeding only in capturing Charles Darwin (David Tennant). Darwin, recognizing that Polly is in fact the last living dodo, convinces Pirate Captain to travel to England, where a science competition will bring him the treasure he needs to win the Pirate of the Year award.

Pirates is filled with references to modern-day items or situations, such as the idea of reversing a boat into a dock like a car, Pirate Captain sipping out of a “World’s Best Captain” mug, or even the cannonballs being treated like a classic arcade skee-ball game. There is even a scene that involves elevator music and references to The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (or the film that borrowed it from that, The Shining) with “Heeeeeere’s Polly!” In fact, it’s the humor found in this film that makes it so much fun; the only moral message that I can derive is that you don’t need to be adored by everyone when you have the love of your friends, an idea that isn’t even hugely stressed.

There isn’t much else to say about this movie. It’s funny, it’s enjoyable, the incredibly unorthodox Pirate Captain and his crew are incredibly amusing, and it simply tells a good story, with entertaining twists on historical figures such as Charles Darwin (who is called “Chuck” once or twice and has a pet chimpanzee wearing a tuxedo) and Queen Victoria (voiced by Imelda Staunton; called “Vicky” by Pirate Captain). None of the humor feels forced or uninspired, which is refreshing among so many of the so-called “comedy” films released nowadays. I don’t think it’ll win Best Animated Feature, but The Pirates! Band of Misfits is certainly better than Disney/Pixar’s Brave was (read my review here), making it one of the top four animated films of 2012.

-Chad

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

MPAA: PG – for mild action, rude humor and some language


Finding Nemo (2003)

As a child, Finding Nemo wasn’t a film that I caught in theaters. In fact, I didn’t see it at all until a few years after it had been released. Though not my favorite Pixar film, it’s certainly an enjoyable one, enough to convince me to go catch it in theaters when it was re-released in 3D back in September of 2012. I’m a firm believer in the idea that films were made to be seen on the big screen, so I always try to go to theater re-releases of films I enjoy, even though 3D is sometimes less than okay. However, Finding Nemo 3D was a great theater experience that also translated well to the recent 3D Blu-Ray release.

In case you’ve been living in a hole in the ground for the past ten years, Finding Nemo is about a single father, Marlin (Albert Brooks), whose son is kidnapped by a diver and taken to Sydney, Australia. In order to find his son, Nemo, he traverses the entire ocean, meeting along the way a forgetful fish named Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), a friendly shark named Bruce (Barry Humphries), a gnarly sea turtle named Crush (Andrew Stanton), and a pelican named Nigel (Geoffrey Rush). All the while, Nemo (Alexander Gould) and his new tank friends, lead by Gill (Willem Dafoe), must devise a plan to help them escape from the dentist office where they are being kept before the dentist’s careless niece can get her hands on the young clownfish.

The people at Pixar have always astounded me with their ability to pack so much humanity into their often inhuman characters, i.e. the toys of Toy Story, the bugs of A Bug’s Life, and, later, the robots of Wall-E. In Finding Nemo, we have FISH…just about as inhuman as you can get, as far as living organisms go. But that doesn’t stop us from sympathizing with Marlin as he struggles to find his lost son or rooting for Nemo as he succeeds in overcoming his fears faced in the fish tank at the dentist office or shedding a tear when Marlin has given up hope and says goodbye to Dory. These characters are just as endearing as any human character out there, if not more. They teach us to trust each other, especially those we love, that it’s okay to let go sometimes, and that we can and should learn from our mistakes.

In addition to the fantastic characters, this film is also visually stunning. The physics of the ocean and its inhabitants feel very authentic – even the physical movement of the fish – despite the fact that everything is animated. The 3D is also well-done (one of the best films I’ve ever seen in 3D), with it fully absorbing you into the atmosphere of the film. The 3D home release is even better than it was in the theater; on a high-definition 3D TV, everything is crystal clear and fully immersive.

Pixar has a track record unmatched by any other film company. Though perfection is impossible, I would say that Pixar has several “perfect” films, and Finding Nemo is one of them. The characters are three-dimensional (in a character growth sort of way, I mean), the story is touching, and the score by Thomas Newman is one of the best of all of the Pixar films. With humor appropriate for both children and adults and several important life lessons to be learned, there is much to be missed if you’ve managed to never see this film – and I’d even recommend the 3D version, if you don’t mind the glasses.

-Chad

Rating: 5 (out of 5)

MPAA: G


Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol (2011) – Michael Giacchino

Much like the Mission Impossible films starring Tom Cruise are almost spoofs of themselves, Michael Giacchino’s score to the latest installment, Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, spoofs both itself and every other action movie score…and it’s fantastic.

The album is as over-the-top as you can get, transitioning from eerie background music, such as in the opening track, “Give Her My Budapest,” into long, sweeping melodies, as heard in “A Man, a Plan, a Code, Dubai,” to exciting action music, such as in “World’s Worst Parking Valet.” All the while, we hear the iconic Mission Impossible theme song interspersed throughout, brilliantly blended into new music that manages to sometimes disguise it and at other times enhance it. Giacchino gives us music that is as loud and rambunctious as the action in the film itself, helping to form a sort of caricature of the action genre of film and the stereotypical action score.

Despite his ability to deliver these moments of almost obnoxious (in a good way), rowdy music, Giacchino sticks to his guns and manages to give us plenty of brilliant, quiet moments as well, such as in the tracks “Moreau Trouble Than She’s Worth” and “Putting the Miss in Mission.” Additionally, “Ghost Protocol” provides us with some chillingly dissonant music that slowly builds into a theme that I would describe as angsty and conflicted – a perfect embodiment of what is going on in the film at the time.

Giacchino, known for his scores to Disney/Pixar’s The Incredibles and Up, as well as his score to the J. J. Abrams Star Trek reboot, continues to show his diversity across genres with this score to Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, a score that is just as smart as it is fun. With the traditional wit found in the track titles (e.g. “In Russia, Phone Dials You,” “From Russia With Shove,” “Mumbai’s the Word,” etc.), this score is yet another testament to the fact that Giacchino is one of the best in the business.

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

  1. Give Her My Budapest (1:57)
  2. Light The Fuse (2:01)
  3. Knife To A Gun Fight (3:42)
  4. In Russia, Phone Dials You (1:40)
  5. Kremlin With Anticipation (4:12)
  6. From Russia With Shove (3:37)
  7. Ghost Protocol (4:58)
  8. Railcar Rundown (1:11)
  9. Hendricks’ Manifesto (3:17)
  10. A Man, A Plan, A Code, Dubai (2:44)
  11. Love The Glove (3:44)
  12. The Express Elevator (2:31)
  13. Mission Impersonatable (3:55)
  14. Moreau Trouble Than She’s Worth (6:44)
  15. Out For A Run (3:54)
  16. Eye Of The Wistrom (1:05)
  17. Mood India (4:28)
  18. Mumbai’s The Word (7:14)
  19. Launch Is On Hendricks (2:22)
  20. World’s Worst Parking Valet (5:03)
  21. Putting The Miss In Mission (5:19)
  22. Mission: Impossible Theme (Out With A Bang Version) (0:53)

Total Length: app. 77 min.

iTunes Album Link

-Chad

P.S. – Read my review of the film here!


Wreck-It Ralph (2012)

Wreck-It Ralph is a film that I’ve been looking forward to for months. Disney Animation has been doing things right the past couple of years, and who could resist a film that revolves around a video game character? I certainly couldn’t, so I made sure to go to the midnight premiere…I loved it!

John C. Reilly as the title character is fun and lovable despite his role as a “bad guy,” but, as a character at the support group for video game villains puts it, “just because you are a ‘bad guy’ does not make you bad…guy!” However, this isn’t convincing enough for Ralph, who longs to be treated with the same respect that is given to the hero of his game, Fix-It Felix, so he goes game-hopping in a search for a medal, which he thinks will make him a hero in his own right and afford him the respect he deserves. As expected, his plans go awry when he ends up staying true to his name and wrecking things everywhere he goes, including in a candy-based racing game called “Sugar Rush.” It is here where he meets Vanellope Von Schweetz, a kindred heart who wants nothing more than to be a racer like so many other occupants in her game, but she is excluded in true reindeer fashion, just like Ralph. It is the relationship between Ralph and Vanellope that gives the film its heart.

The world seen in the film is super creative; we see a “Game Central,” which is located in the surge protector that provides power to all of the games in the arcade. The various video game characters travel to Game Central via train through their power cords…how genius is that? The visuals are stunning and colorful, and, believe it or not, are actually enhanced by the 3D.

Filled with video game references out the wazoo and puns galore, Wreck-It Ralph was everything that I wanted it to be. John C. Reilly and Sarah Silverman as the two main characters are delightful, and Jane Lynch (Glee) and Jack McBrayer (30 Rock) bring a lot to the table as well. Of course, I would be remiss to not mention the fantastic musical score by Henry Jackman, most recently known for composing the score to X-Men: First Class. Filled with fun video game music references throughout, as well as including plenty of traditional, fun movie music, Jackman’s score only adds wonder to this fantastic world created by Disney. While Wreck-It Ralph certainly caters to a younger audience, adults will find plenty to love about it as well because it also carries a great message: being yourself is something to be proud of, no matter what others may say or think.

-Chad

Rating: 4.5 (out of 5)

MPAA: PG – for some rude humor and mild action/violence

P.S. – The animated short shown before the film, Paperman, was nothing short of amazing. A good way to describe it would be to call it Wall-E with humans and less outer space. Despite the fact that there is no dialogue, we’re treated to one of the best love stories I’ve ever witnessed. It’s about following your heart and about how love is more important than all other things, and the animation is absolutely gorgeous. I would watch Paperman over and over again by itself if I could. Go see Wreck-It Ralph in theaters so that you can see this short as well, and then you can try and hide your tears of joy just like the rest of us did.


Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

While I would definitely consider myself a fan of musicals, Little Shop of Horrors was something completely different from the types of musicals that I am accustomed to. This, along with the fun, quirky Rick Moranis in the lead – as well as the several cameo appearances by other various comedians – provided me with a great new musical experience that I really enjoyed.

Rick Moranis as a man who buys and nurtures a killer plant seems natural after having seen him in other crazy roles such as Louis in Ghostbusters, as Wayne Szalinksi in Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, and as Barney Rubble in The Flintstones; his talent for appearing serious in a not-serious role is quite entertaining, as are the various kooky faces he makes in reaction to his surroundings. I was surprised at how well Moranis sung everything, but it certainly wasn’t “professional” quality. In fact, the lack of polish in the singing made the character even more enjoyable.

Steve Martin as the sadistic dentist character was actually pretty creepy – him singing “Dentist” was terrifying – but, like Moranis, Martin has a talent for playing insane characters without having the audience question it.

The most impressive part of the film, however, was the plant, Audrey II. I was amazed at how realistically the mouth moved along with the lyrics, all with puppetry. The voice of Audrey II, Levi Stubbs (the lead singer for The Four Tops), was also quite entertaining; his varying vocal range was hysterical, with him moving from speaking in a low octave to almost a screech in a higher octave. (I also think it would be appropriate to mention that the film was directed by Frank Oz, who is more famously known as the puppeteer who voiced both Yoda in the Star Wars films and Miss Piggy in The Muppets.)

I’ll admit that I didn’t care for the character of Audrey, played by Ellen Greene, mainly because of the way Greene played her, with that squeaky voice…though I’ll admit that it made me laugh a couple of times during “Suddenly, Seymour”.

Speaking of the music, it was fantastic, though I wouldn’t expect anything less from an Alan Menken/Howard Ashman collaboration. The style was fun and catchy, the lyrics were clever and often quite funny, and they were all performed very well by the cast. The use of the trio of women as a “gospel chorus” (as Wikipedia informs me it is called) is amusing as it seems to foreshadow Alan Menken’s future involvement with Disney’s Hercules, which features a similar trio of singing women.

Overall, Little Shop of Horrors is definitely something different than the typical musical production popular in America, but that doesn’t make it any less entertaining. With Moranis in the lead, Martin supporting, and several cameos by the likes of Bill Murray, John Candy, Christopher Guest, and James Belushi, there are plenty of laughs to go around, and the infectious music by Menken and Ashman provide a unique experience for the audience as they watch chaos unfold onscreen.

-Chad

Rating: 3.5 (out of 5)

MPAA: PG-13 – for mature thematic material including comic horror violence, substance abuse, language and sex references


TRON: Legacy (2010) – Daft Punk

I think that the high quality of Daft Punk’s score for TRON: Legacy was unexpected for most people, but, in retrospect, it makes perfect sense: get a musical duo famous for their electronic music to compose the score to a film whose setting takes place primarily in an electronic world.

And it’s the electronic music featured in this score that makes it so great. From the Vangelis-esque “Overture” to the infectious club groove “End of Line” (the title a reference to the original TRON film) to the aggressive “Disc Wars”, Daft Punk has managed to create a score that works well as both a companion to the film it was written for and as a standalone work of art. However, there is plenty of traditional film music – that is to say, orchestral rather than electronic – that is just as good, such as in the tracks “Recognizer”, which sort of emulates the feel of electronic music, the beautiful “Nocturne”, and “Finale”, which features some excellent brass as well as some soaring strings.

While it’s not the greatest film score of all time, it’s definitely one of the better scores composed by a musical group not known for its film scores. Daft Punk’s music for TRON: Legacy fits the setting tremendously well, enhancing the crisp visuals with an exciting soundtrack that combines traditional film scoring with newer ideas to create something unique and satisfying.

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

1. “Overture” 2:28
2. “The Grid” 1:37
3. “The Son of Flynn” 1:35
4. “Recognizer” 2:38
5. “Armory” 2:03
6. “Arena” 1:33
7. “Rinzler” 2:18
8. “The Game Has Changed” 3:25
9. “Outlands” 2:42
10. “Adagio for Tron” 4:11
11. “Nocturne” 1:42
12. “End of Line” 2:36
13. “Derezzed” 1:44
14. “Fall” 1:23
15. “Solar Sailer” 2:42
16. “Rectifier” 2:14
17. “Disc Wars” 4:11
18. “C.L.U.” 4:39
19. “Arrival” 2:00
20. “Flynn Lives” 3:22
21. “Tron Legacy (End Titles)” 3:18
22. “Finale” 4:23

Total Length: app. 59 min.

iTunes Album Link

-Chad


Tangled (2010) – Alan Menken

Alan Menken’s score for 2010’s Tangled is like a modern update to the scores of the classic Disney films of the 1990s; who better to bring new life to the classic scores than the man who originally scored/wrote songs for The Little MermaidBeauty and the BeastAladdin, PocahontasHercules, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame?

The best part about this score is that the styles vary so completely from track to track. The first instrumental track we hear is titled “Flynn Wanted”, and it manages to effectively capture the swashbuckling, adventurous feel that Eugene Fitzherbert tries to emulate as the thieving Flynn Rider. Two tracks later, “Horse With No Rider” introduces an eerie, anxious theme that serves as a backdrop to Mother Gothel’s realization that Rapunzel may have been found and the subsequent panicked flee back to the tower. And still something different is “Campfire”, in which we hear some subtle hints at the main theme for the musical number “I See the Light”, a play at the budding relationship between our two protagonists. The ending to “The Tear Heals” is filled with the emotion appropriate to the situation; it’s grand, heartfelt, and, to use a bit of a cliche, magical.

Of course, the real highlights of Tangled‘s soundtrack are the musical numbers, which the score only serves as backup to. In “When Will My Life Begin” and its two reprises, we see the main conflict within Rapunzel: her desire to do something with her life other than stay in the tower forever. While I’m not a particular fan of “Mother Knows Best”, it is an appropriate introduction to Mother Gothel, and, even more, a setup for an excellent reprise. “I’ve Got a Dream” is a hilarious, raucous sing-along that shows us that “our differences ain’t really that extreme”. The real standout song of this album, though, is “I See the Light”, a beautiful duet between Rapunzel and Eugene that reminds me of Aladdin‘s “A Whole New World” every time I hear it…but in a good way.

Overall, while the score only features a couple of standout moments (“Kingdom Dance” is my favorite), the musical numbers are what you buy the album for. With fantastic performances by Mandy Moore and Zachery Levi, the score for Tangled is a return to the classic Disney singalong animated film; it’s fun, it’s touching, and it tells a wonderful story.

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

  1. “When Will My Life Begin”   2:32
  2. “When Will My Life Begin (Reprise 1)”   1:03
  3. “Mother Knows Best”   3:10
  4. “When Will My Life Begin (Reprise 2)”   2:06
  5. “I’ve Got a Dream”   3:11
  6. “Mother Knows Best (Reprise)”   1:38
  7. “I See the Light”   3:44
  8. “Healing Incantation”   0:54
  9. “Flynn Wanted”   2:51
  10. “Prologue”   2:03
  11. “Horse With No Rider”   1:57
  12. “Escape Route”   1:57
  13. “Campfire”   3:22
  14. “Kingdom Dance”   2:20
  15. “Waiting for the Lights”   2:48
  16. “Return to Mother”   2:07
  17. “Realization and Escape”   5:51
  18. “The Tear Heals”   7:38
  19. “Kingdom Celebration”   1:51
  20. “Something That I Want”   (Grace Potter)   2:43

Total Length: app. 56 min.

iTunes Album Link

-Chad

P.S. – Read my review of the film here!


A Bug’s Life (1998) – Randy Newman

Disney/Pixar’s A Bug’s Life is one of my favorite of the Pixar soundtracks, and certainly my favorite of Randy Newman’s Pixar scores.

The first song on the album is “The Time of Your Life”, sung by Newman himself, which I had never paid much attention to until tonight; I knew the first line and the chorus, but ignored the rest because I didn’t see how it connected to the film. As it turns out, the lyrics are all about being ambitious and pursuing what you love; in other words, it describes Flik in the film. Who’d have thought it, eh? The song itself is catchy, and it’s heavily referenced in the orchestral score in tracks like “Seed to Tree” and “Flik Leaves” – both of which are meant to foreshadow Flik’s rise to greatness as the film progresses.

Newman plays around with leitmotifs, composing an industrial, hip-sounding theme for Flik’s grain-harvesting machine and for the city (“The Flik Machine”, “The City”), a sort of “aggression” theme heard in “The Bird Flies” and “Ants Fight Back”, a gypsy-like theme for the circus bugs introduced in “Circus Bugs” and hinted at again in “Loser”, and a few other various themes heard throughout. The way each of these leitmotifs is interlaced into the score is like a game of tug-of-war; each melody is designed to pull your attention to the character(s) they represent, and they each take turns pulling your attention back and forth.

Since this was only Newman’s second Pixar film score, most of the material in A Bug’s Life is pretty original, minus a bit of the filler music (non-thematic material) that resembles his score to Toy Story. Newman’s score brings a sense of grandeur to a world that we rarely think about because of how minuscule it is, showing that, while our world may be big to us, it’s even bigger to a bug; they can have big adventures too! My favorite track is the last one on the album, “A Bug’s Life Suite”, because it contains all of the main themes heard throughout the film…seriously, go listen to that! All film soundtracks should be required to have suites/overtures.

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

1. “The Time of Your Life” (performed by Newman) 3:16
2. “The Flik Machine” 2:54
3. “Seed to Tree” 1:01
4. “Red Alert” 1:49
5. “Hopper and his Gang” 3:21
6. “Flik Leaves” 2:37
7. “Circus Bugs” 1:27
8. “The City” 2:35
9. “Robin Hood” 0:59
10. “Return to Colony” 1:33
11. “Flik’s Return” 1:24
12. “Loser” 2:43
13. “Dot’s Rescue” 4:00
14. “Atta” 1:08
15. “Don’t Come Back” 1:07
16. “Grasshoppers’ Return” 3:01
17. “The Bird Flies” 2:38
18. “Ants Fight Back” 2:14
19. “Victory” 2:33
20. “A Bug’s Life Suite” 5:12

Total Length: app. 48 min.

iTunes Album Link

-Chad


Brave (2012)

I’ll say this now: lots of this review is going to be negative, but be patient…I did enjoy this movie and will give it a not-terrible rating. I just have lots of things to say about it.

I don’t know whether to praise or criticize the people who were in charge of promoting Brave. For a year, we were shown various trailers and posters that were vague about the plot of the movie, and, for a while, the film looked very uninteresting. As in, I had absolutely no desire to see it. However, a couple of months before its release, we were finally treated to a trailer that made me a tad bit excited, resulting in me attending the midnight showing.

None of the trailers or promotional material (that I saw) gave any indication as to what the movie actually turned out to be. A good thing, usually. Judging from trailers, I thought that I would be watching this girl with a bow and arrow shoot stuff all the time and gain her freedom. The trailers were completely misleading, though; as it turned out, the bow and arrow had very little to do with the plot of the film. At first, I felt a little bit cheated…this wasn’t what I paid to see! But, as I said, I did enjoy it, though it was much different than I expected it to be.

My biggest complaint of this film is the title. Just about the only relevance that it has to the plot is a line spoken by Merida merely seconds before the end credits flash. What did she do that was brave? She didn’t take charge of her own life, she didn’t stand up against anyone (she argued with her mother, but I wouldn’t call that brave), and the main plot resulted from her running away from the castle in anguish…in other words, not brave at all. I feel like “Fate” would have been a much better title. I don’t want to give away any plot details here, but trust me: “Fate” would have been a better title.

Brave also featured several things that were very – how should I say it? – un-Disney. Bare rear ends and ample cleavage are both displayed prominently, and there’s even a moment when a toddler dives into said cleavage…very, very un-Disney.

But still, the plot, while not the one the trailers seemed to promise, was sweet, and there were lots of great moments throughout that encouraged laughter, provoked thought, and asked us to make amends with our loved ones rather than do something drastic. Brave does have its moments where it seems to rush or it gets all too predictable, but the spectacular animation, the fitting score by Patrick Doyle, and the enjoyable story make it worth the watch. Also, the animated short attached to the film, La Luna, is fantastic. I highly recommend this film to mothers and daughters especially, though boys will find things to enjoy as well.

-Chad

Rating: 3 (out of 5)

MPAA: PG – for some scary action and rude humor

Note: I normally have no qualms with 3D films, but this film is often dark, meaning that the 3D glasses make it even darker and more difficult to see…a painful strain on the eyes. Unfortunately, both the second and third screenings I saw were presented in 3D (2D wasn’t available on the Disney cruise ship); I’m glad that I first saw it in 2D.


Beauty and the Beast (1991)

What is there to say about Disney’s Beauty and the Beast other than to talk about how good it is?

Featuring relatively unknown actors in the lead roles (at least, unknown to me; Paige O’Hara and Robby Benson), with Angela Lansbury, David Ogden Stiers, and Jerry Orbach in delightful supporting roles, this film excels in humanizing its characters…even the ones who aren’t quite human anymore. We see the Beast’s change from a self-centered creature who wants nothing more than his human form back into a respectable man who loves this woman more than himself or his own wants. We also see Belle, an outcast in her village, fall in love with the Beast, an outcast in the strictest sense of the word – an unexpected match that shows that, deep down, they want the same thing: companionship and acceptance.

Richard White is a perfect blend of obnoxious and menace as the film’s villain, Gaston, a self-centered pig who aspires to do anything in his power to make Belle his wife…including arranging to have her father committed in an asylum to make her say “yes”. Songs like “Gaston” and “The Mob Song” define the character as arrogant, selfish, and violent, but, really, that’s what makes the character so much fun! He and his little friend Lefou bring lots of laughs to the screen (“Lefou, I’m afraid I’ve been thinking…”/”A dangerous pastime!”/”I know!”) while still allowing the audience to acknowledge that he is, indeed, the bad guy.

Flecked with colorful characters, brilliant artwork, and charming songs like “Be Our Guest” and “Something There”, as well as the ballad that manages to make me tear up every time I hear it, “Beauty and the Beast”, Beauty and the Beast, while not my personal favorite animated Disney movie, is still as magical now as it was when I first saw it on VHS in my living room as a child. Disney, the combined musical and lyrical genius of Alan Menken and the late Howard Ashman, and the talented voice cast bring this story to life in a way that will be loved by viewers of all ages forever.

Rating: 5 (out of 5)

MPAA: G

-Chad

P.S. – Make sure to view the special edition of the film which includes the song “Human Again”!