Tag Archives: The Incredible Hulk

The Avengers (2012)

When I first learned of this film in the year or two before its release, I kind of ignored it; traditionally, I’m not a huge superhero movie fan, with Batman being an exception. But as time went by and the final Marvel movies leading up to The Avengers were released, I had a revelation: five superheroes from five completely different movies (plus two extra heroes who were mixed in) were going to be on the big screen together in the same film AT THE SAME TIME. I realized how incredible that was and instantly became a time bomb, ticking away the time as the release grew closer and closer. And it didn’t disappoint.

The Avengers succeeds in just about every possible way a film can succeed. The characters were likable and believable despite their unbelievable abilities, the villain was fantastic, and the script was fun and smart. Tony Stark is back as Robert Downey, Jr. – wait…strike that, reverse it – with hilarious one-liners, Chris Hemsworth as Thor is a better character than he was in his own movie, Chris Evans returns as a fantastically conflicted Captain America, and Tom Hiddleston’s Loki is ten times the villain he was in Thor.

I’m not going to delve too far into the movie, but there is one thing that I DO have to talk about: The Hulk. After two previous films based around the character that were mediocre at best, The Avengers finally got our big angry green guy right. Joss Whedon was smart enough to make Banner/Hulk not someone who tries to avoid being angry but instead someone who embraces his anger and has fun with it. There are three extremely satisfying moments with the Hulk: when he first transforms in NYC, when he punches Thor, and when he smashes Loki. Mark Ruffalo also might be my favorite Bruce Banner so far, which is an added bonus. The Hulk just might have been the best character in this film.

So, how good is this film? Let me put it this way – I’ve seen it four times, and I have friends who have seen it more times than that. I could ramble on and on about how great this film was, but I’ll let you see it and decide for yourselves. Everything about this movie is great; if you don’t enjoy it at least a little bit, you must not like fun very much. Go check it out!

-Chad

Rating: 5 (out of 5)

MPAA: PG-13 – for intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action throughout, and a mild drug reference

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The Incredible Hulk (2008) – Craig Armstrong

I was fully prepared to listen to Craig Armstrong’s score to the 2008 film The Incredible Hulk and give it a bad review, but things didn’t go according to plan. When I first acquired this soundtrack about a month or so ago, I was pretty unimpressed, listening to it just for the sake of listening to it. Nothing stood out to me, nothing was terribly memorable; it was just pretty lackluster, in my opinion. However, once again, listening to it from the perspective of someone about to write a review on it completely changed my opinion.

First, let me say this: as a whole, this score IS pretty forgettable. But it’s not because it’s a forgettable score, if that makes sense. It’s because there’s not a catchy main theme that stands out. Right now, at this very moment, I could sing to you the theme songs for Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, and The Avengers, but I wouldn’t be able to sing you a single bit of music from The Incredible Hulk, despite the fact that the main theme for the film is heard throughout the score. It’s a shame, really, that the main theme isn’t something iconic or catchy because it’s darned good.

The Incredible Hulk’s score is full of emotion, exploring the inner conflict of Bruce/The Hulk in tracks like “Bruce Can’t Stay” and “I Can’t”, as well as the relationships between various characters in the film. These tracks are rather helpfully given titles that identify the people: “Ross and Blonsky”, “Hulk and Betty”, and “Bruce and Betty”. This score is also filled with action, from the incredibly exciting “Favela Escape” to “Abomination Alley” to “Harlem Brawl”.

Where Armstrong fails is in composing a theme that, like the character, would be instantly recognizable to everyone who heard it. He sacrifices memorability for content, which is of higher quality than the film itself. As I said, it’s a shame, but it’s also a blessing. I’d personally prefer an overall awesome score with a non-memorable melody than an awful score with an awesome theme. What are my favorite tracks, you ask? “Favela Escape”, “Bruce Can’t Stay”, “Bruce Must Do It”, “Are They Dead?”, and “Hulk Smash” stand out to me as particularly awesome.

Rating: 4 (out of 5)

Disc 1

  1. “The Arctic” (2:47)
  2. “Main Title” (2:39)
  3. “Rocinha Favela” (3:11)
  4. “A Drop of Blood” (1:35)
  5. “The Flower” (2:49)
  6. “Ross’ Team” (1:33)
  7. “Mr. Blue” (1:03)
  8. “Favela Escape” (3:35)
  9. “It Was Banner” (1:32)
  10. “That Is the Target” (5:34)
  11. “Bruce Goes Home” (1:25)
  12. “Ross and Blonsky” (3:15)
  13. “Return to Culver University” (2:39)
  14. “The Lab” (1:17)
  15. “Reunion” (3:37)
  16. “The Data/The Vial” (1:20)
  17. “They’re Here” (3:07)
  18. “Give Him Everything You’ve Got” (6:08)
  19. “Bruce Can’t Stay” (1:54)
  20. “First Injection” (1:03)
  21. “Is It Safe?” (1:07)
  22. “Hulk Theme” (3:59)

Disc 2

  1. “Saved from the Flames” (0:53)
  2. “Grotto” (2:53)
  3. “Arrival at the Motel” (1:48)
  4. “I Can’t” (2:15)
  5. “Abomination Alley” (3:56)
  6. “Bruce Found” (2:52)
  7. “Bruce Looks for the Data”(1:05)
  8. “NYC Cab Ride” (1:17)
  9. “The Mirror” (1:17)
  10. “Sterns’ Lab” (4:17)
  11. “Bruce Darted” (3:00)
  12. “I Want It, I Need It” (1:36)
  13. “Blonsky Transforms” (1:16)
  14. “Bruce Must Do It” (2:11)
  15. “Harlem Brawl” (3:51)
  16. “Are They Dead?” (2:40)
  17. “Hulk Smash” (2:25)
  18. “Hulk and Betty” (1:50)
  19. “A Tear” (1:01)
  20. “Who’s We?” (0:56)
  21. “The Necklace” (1:44)
  22. “Bruce and Betty” (5:06)
  23. “Hulk Theme (End Credits)” (3:59)

Total Length: app. 112 min.

Amazon Album Link

-Chad

Notes: This album is not available on iTunes, so I have provided the link to the album on Amazon.com above. Also, I own the 2-disc version of this album. For a condensed version available for mp3 download, click here.